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Suffragettes, Extinction Rebellion, and Being a Damned Nuisance

Recently Terry Laidler posted an image that encouraged supporters of the Extinction Rebellion to be like the Suffragettes.

Ever ready to parade his ignorance of history in a public place, Geoff Kelly argued:

They didn't spit on people, jostle people, scream in their faces, and generally express hate and contempt for,those who,disagreed with them. The women showed the way. The Extinction mob simply display feral disregard and contempt for anyone who dares to disagree with them. The women got a tide of support. The ferals are getting a tide of odium.

In reality, the suffragettes used more violence than the Extinction Rebellion activities, Far more.

They whipped Churchill at a train station.

They bombarded Prime Minster Asquith’s car with a catapult.

They smashed the glass of Glasgow Art Gallery. Smashed the windows of banks and post offices. Cut the the telegraph wires.

They burned down Kew gardens tea house.

They completely destroyed Saunderton and Croxley Station railway station.

Bombs were discovered in St Paul’s and the Metropolitan Tabernacle, where a postcard was left bearing the words, ‘Put your religion into practice and give the women freedom.’

We should be so lucky that the Extinction Rebellion has been so concerned with non-violent direct action.

But their patience is wearing very thin indeed.

https://www.bl.uk/votes-for-women/articles/suffragettes-violence-and-mil...

"Militant suffragettes destroyed contents of letterboxes and smashed the windows of thousands of shops and offices. They cut telephone wires, burned down the houses of politicians and prominent members of society, set cricket pavilions alight and carved slogans into golf courses. They slashed paintings in art galleries, destroyed exhibitions at the British Museum and planted bombs in St Paul’s Cathedral, Westminster Abbey and near the Bank of England."
https://theconversation.com/militant-suffragettes-morally-justified-or-j...

See also:
An Examination of Suffragette Violence
C. J. Bearman
The English Historical Review
Vol. 120, No. 486 (Apr., 2005), pp. 365-397
https://www.jstor.org/stable/3490924?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents

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